Values & Ethics in Education
Time
Location

If you intend to take this course Spring/Fall 201x,
please download and read this article
Doing Ethics: concerns & procedures

You can contact the instructor via the email link below:
Department
University

RETURN
edited 1/17/10

I. Course Description

This course examines in detail how one justifies ethical choices and the nature of controversy resulting from differences in ethical perspective. It examines the role of education in relating values to behavior, and of personal choice to social choice. It looks at policies that purport to pursue various educational values, the conceptions of justice underlying them and their relationship to both the mechanisms and actualities of benefit-cost distributions in our society.

The CD for the course will be available the first night of class. It is:

Rozycki, Documents and Exercises: Ethics and Values in Education, CD NewFoundations Press 2008

A pdf of the Ethics workbook is available : CLICK HERE

The class will be divided in teams of two. Each member of the team will be responsible for one of the two required texts. You should wait until after the first class to obtain the texts after consulting with your team member, unless you want both.

Available on line are the recommended texts,

Hinman, Lawrence M. Ethics: A pluralistic approach to moral theory Thomson/Wadsworth 2003

Weston, Anthony A 21st Century Ethical Toolbox Oxford U Press 2001

Other materials and articles will be developed as needed.

(See, especially, the websites of Professor Danney Ursery at St. Edward's University in Austin, Texas.)

Other suggested readings:

The Lucifer Effect: Understanding How Good People Turn Evil by Philip Zimbardo (see Zimbardo's site at http://www.lucifereffect.com/ .

Moral Mazes: The World of Corporate Managers by Robert Jackall (Paperback) (ISBN 0-19-506080-6). You can find a review at http://www.ibe.org.uk/teaching/review_8.htm

II. Major Course Objective: Through student and instructor presentations, reading, critique, and discussion, the participant will understand and be able to analyze ethical controversies and those ideological, economic and other factors which have shaped educational policy and practice.

III. Learning Activities

Teaching methodologies will include the use of case study analysis techniques, lectures, dialogue, diagnostic sessions, visual displays, question and answer periods, situational simulations and immediate evaluation feedback.

IV. Evaluation: Evaluation : grades will be primarily based on a term paper. This will be 75% of your grade. Also, a series of "mini-comps" will be given. These will be based on class discussions and readings and administered so as to mimic the actual Doctoral Comprehensive Examinations. Passing grades on 80% of them is required (but not sufficient) to achieve the grade of A.

Grades Range from A (4.0), A- (3.7), B+ (3.3), B (3.0), B- (2.7), C (2.0), F (0.0). Incompletes (I) will be given for good reason if work remains unfinished at the end of the semester. The highest makeup grade for an incomplete is a B.

V. Requirements (click for details)

A. Individual Papers presented on specific topics from the texts.. (Click for Samples with critiques)

B. Critiques written in reaction to the presentations of other classmates.

C. Passing grades on 60% of in-class minicomps.

D. A final paper responding to the class critiques of the original presentation

.
VI. Appeal Procedure for Student Academic grievances. (See Student Handbook)
VII. Academic Fraud (See Student Handbook)

VIII. Writing Process (see chart)

a. Every participant will write and distribute the initial draft a major paper (M) for presentation (up to 2400 words)

b. Every participant will write and distribute an 1600 word critique (C) of 2 other M's.

c. Every participant will respond to those critiques in discussion that follows a 10 minute partial reading and fuller (up to 30 minutes) presentation of the original or rewritten M.

d. A final paper reworked from the major presentation responding to critiques by classmates and instructor is due by the last session.

IX. Default Calendar (Planned for twenty participants -- to be adjusted with student participation to address student research interests)

ETHICS Spring 2009
Wed
PRESENTATION
PRESENTATION
1/14 Introduction       3/18
Presuppositions AC8
M9
C7
P5
Overview      
Errors w42
Article: Breaking Rules      
Argument w43, 57
M10
C8
P6
Ethical Concepts      
Operatnlizng AC13, w22
       
Mission v Function
M11
        H7: Rights
1/21 Assault, Argument
3/25 Social Choice
M12
C9
P7
CD Contents
Pseudo Solutns AC5
M13
C10
P8
Discuss Assault Article
NameCalling AC6
The Nature of Forensic Argument
C11
H1 (Hinman 1) Moral Point of View
H8: Justice
1/28
Case Analysis       4/1
Moral Theories
M14
C12
P9
Intro w 6-14, 16
     
Justice w39
w44 Evidence, Initial Case Analysis
     
Case Study Groups
M15
C13
P10
An. Controversy (AC) Workbook (w)55
     
H1 (Hinman 1) Moral Point of View      
M16
P11
          H9: Character
2/4
Values& Consensus
4/8
Review Values
M17
C14
P12
school priorities w24
Perspectives on Society
basic org conflicts 27
Case Study
M18
C15
P13
Slogans AC2
w33
Econ of Tchng w41
Reifications AC3
w 17
C16
H2: Diversity in Morals
H10: Diversity/Gender
2/11
MiniComp
M1
4/15
MiniComp
M19
C17
P14
teaching that, to
Fact&Value AC 15
dispositns v behavr
M2
Responsibility AC 17
M20
C18
P15
Benefits&Costs AC16 w19
Case Study Groups
Rationality
w30
P16
H3: Divine Commands
Do w 25
H11: Diversity/race, ethnicity
2/18
Values
M3:
C1
4/22
Review Argument
C19
P17
enabling conditions
Case Study
Probability w 62
M4:
C2
C20
P18
Expected Value w21,56
Case Study Groups
H12: A Global Ethic
  H4:Selfishness
           
2/25
Priorities Action w23, 58
M5
C3:
P1
4/29
Case Study Groups
P19
Celebrate/Pejorate
Disputes AC18
Controversy AC1
M6
C4:
P2
Society AC10
P20
Consensus AC9 w20
H5: Consequentialism w46-52
Plagiarism & Cheating
       
3/11
Minicomp
M7
C5
P3:
5/6
Administrative
Final Papers Due 
Argument w53
Formalsm v Case Study
M8
C6
P4:
w36 Two Approaches
w38 Punishment
H6: Duty

 

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