Violence, Imposition, Wrongdoing
©1999 Edward G. Rozycki, Ed.D.

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edited 4/14/12

Step 1: Consider these related and contrasting terms. Don't worry about their definitions. Just be aware that these terms can influence our understanding of what violence or imposition or wrongdoing is.

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CHART A
violence
imposition
wrongdoing
Some Related Terms strength, force, vigor, speed, fury, commotion, clash  intrusion, encumbrance, onus, demand, misuse misdeed, dereliction, delinquency, fault, crime, felony
Some Contrasting Terms calm, gentleness, quiet, weakness, peace, emptiness favor, freedom, permission, willingness honor, favor, gift, help, support, duty, obligation, donation

Step 2: Read through all Case Examples below. Note their points of contrast and comparison.

Step 3: Identification of Examples. Working alone, use the following scale to evaluate each case as an example of violence or imposition or wrongdoing. Do each column independently:

CHART B: Case Examples of Jack's Behavior
violence?
imposition?
wrongdoing?
1. Sparring at karate, Jack blocks Sam's kick to his stomach and delivers a hard punch to the side of Sam's headgear.      
2. Sam takes little Billy's Walkman from him and runs away. Jack wrestles Sam to the ground, permitting Billy to recover his radio.      
3. "Please watch my seat while I get a soda," says Jack to Sam seated nearby.      
4. Jack, grabbing Sam by the throat, tells him to hand over his wallet.      
5. Jack shoots Sam dead for not paying attention to him.      
6. For the fourth month in a row, Jack fails to pay his share of the rent, forcing Sam, his roomate, to make up the difference.      
7. Jack, having promised to pay for Sam's Walkman should he lose it, loses the radio and refuses to pay.      
8. Jack hands Sam his book.      
9. Jack, while boxing with Sam, knees him in the groin.      
10. Jack "drops in " on Sam just as Sam is preparing dinner.      

Step 4: Team up with a partner. Note your points of agreement and disagreement. Develop an explanation as to why you disagree. What additional information in each case would bring you to agree on it?

Step 5: Combine your team with another. Note your points of agreement and disagreement. Develop an explanation as to why you disagree. What additional information in each case would bring you to agree on it?

Step 6: Repeat step 5 until the entire group (class) is included and reaches the best consensus possible on each item. Complete this step before going on to step 7.

Step 7. Reclassify. Are some of the cases better described using words from Chart A?

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